CDA Essentials 2016 • Volume 3 • Issue 7 - page 29

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ssues and
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eople
(sticker, toy, etc.). Byworkingcollaborativelywith theparents,
a similar systemof rewards canalsobeput inplaceat home.
Inherwebinar,Mayodiscusseswhat childpsychologists
refer toas “free-response tokens.” Prior toanappointment,
parents cangive their childrenfive tokens and
explainhow theywant them tobehave
during thedental visit andwhat they
donotwant them todo. “Every time
thechildhas abehaviour that isnot
appropriate, theparent takes awaya
token. If thechild is leftwitha tokenat
theendof theappointment, theyearn
something—game timeonavideoconsole
works verywell inmyhouse!” saysMayo.
At-homecare.
It canbechallenging for patientswith
ADHD to followyour instructions regarding their dailyoral
hygiene routine. Impulsivityand inattentioncaneasilyderail
their best intentions. And just likemanyother patients, they
maynot fullyunderstand just how long2minutesof tooth
brushingactually is—or theymayget distracted in the
process. That iswhyMayo suggests theuseof anelectric
toothbrushwitha timer.
Mayoexplains inherwebinar that becausepeoplewith
ADHDexhibit apersonality trait knownas “novelty seeking
behaviour,” theyquickly lose interest inany taskor initiative,
even if they initially responded favourably to it. “What you
suggestduringanappointment, they’re likely tobeboredwith
whenyou see them sixmonths
later. Itwill probablywork for
3–4months, but then they’ll
want thenextnew thing.” To
parentsof childrenwithADHD,
she recommendsusingchecklists,
reward systems, non-verbal cues
suchaspicturesand images,
andover-the-counterdisclosing
solutions tohelp themestablish
andmaintainagoodoral health
routine for their littleones.
a
Wanttoknowmore?
WatchLisa’swebinarat:
VisitLisa’swebsiteforadditional
resources:
lisamayordh.com
Watch the interview
withLisaMayoat
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